Early childhood education works — it just doesn’t reach those most in need

|Source: Apolitical|
A young boy in class at the Precious Gems Nursery. Guyana, September 2018. Credit: GPE/Carolina Valenzuela

In this op-ed, GPE CEO, Alice Albright emphasizes that the overall funding to support early childhood care and education is still very low, despite the evidence that early learning better prepares children for primary school, improves their learning and reduces repetition and drop-out rates.

In addition, while more children are getting access to early learning, those that need it most are still missing out. Positive outcomes are most pronounced among children from vulnerable groups, yet 80% of children in low-income countries still have no access at all to early learning.

GPE has invested about US$200 million in more than 35 partner developing countries to support early childhood care and education. 

Read the op-ed in Apolitical

A young boy in class at the Precious Gems Nursery. Guyana, September 2018. Credit: GPE/Carolina Valenzuela
Latin America and Caribbean: Guyana

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