Scholarships allow girls to go to secondary school in Niger

Thanks to scholarships, more girls are able to go to secondary schools in Niger.

September 21, 2017 by GPE Secretariat
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1 minute read
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Scholarships allow girls to go to secondary school in Niger
In Niger, many girls are unable to attend secondary school because they live too far away. A GPE-supported scholarship program helps match high-performing girls from primary schools at least 5km from town with local host families so they can continue their schooling.
Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
There are 15 girls receiving scholarships at Makalondi Secondary School, Makalondi, Tilaberri Region, Niger. Some of them live as far as 25km away from the school and would not be able to attend without the support of the host family and program. The program has been in place since the start of school year 2015-16.
Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
Marie Djadjary, 16, (left) and Mimbouaba Djataga, 14, (right) received the scholarship last year and again this year to continue their studies at Makalondi Secondary School. They stay together at the house of their guardian, Yombo Djilgou, 41, and the 20 plus members of his extended family, which is about a 30-40 minute walk from school.
Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
Marie and Mimbouaba walk home from school at lunchtime. The girls come from far away (25km and 15km respectively) and would not be able to attend lower secondary school were it not for their ability to stay at the home of a guardian. The scholarship fund provides a monthly payment to the host family and the girls receive a small stipend, to formalize the arrangement.
Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
Marie and Mimbouaba fetch water for bathing from the village well. While living with the host family, the girls only have a few chores, as guardians must agree to encourage the girls to focus on their studies.
Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
Mimbouaba and Marie study together on the bed in the small bedroom they share with the grandmother of the host family. “This year I find English really hard,” Marie says. “A lot of the other students have tutors. But our parents are farmers. There is no way they could afford that. We couldn’t even ask. We just try to do our best.”
Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
As the sun begins to set, Mimbouaba and Marie wash their school uniforms and hang them up to dry for the morning. Ready to start another day of school.
Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
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Gender equality
Sub-Saharan Africa

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