Statement by Alice Albright, CEO of the Global Partnership for Education, on Tanzania’s announcement ensuring equal access to education for young mothers
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Agather Stevene is learning tailoring at Msaginya Folk Development College (FDC), Katavi Region, Tanzania. August 2019. Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
Agather Stevene is learning tailoring at Msaginya Folk Development College (FDC), Katavi Region, Tanzania. August 2019.
Credit:
GPE/Kelley Lynch

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) welcomes the recent announcement from the Government of Tanzania removing barriers to young mothers attending formal schools. This is a positive step towards ensuring girls’ equitable access to education in Tanzania, where over 800,000 girls remain out of school.

Girls have the right to a quality education and must be able to continue their studies, including during pregnancy and after they become mothers. Protecting and investing in girls’ education boosts economic growth, curbs infant mortality, improves child nutrition and plays a critical role in a country’s overall social and economic development.

In anticipation of specific guidelines on reintegrating pregnant girls into formal schools, GPE will continue its engagement with the Government of Tanzania and partners to help transform the education system and offer quality education to all children, no matter their circumstances.

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About GPE

GPE is a shared commitment to end the world’s learning crisis. It is the only global partnership and fund dedicated entirely to helping children in lower-income countries get a quality education, so they can unlock their potential and contribute to building a better world.

For nearly 20 years, GPE has mobilized partners and funds to get 160 million more girls and boys in school and improve learning in 76 partner countries around the world.

Now, GPE is working to help governments transform their education systems to get the most vulnerable children in school, improve teaching and learning, and build resilient education systems capable of withstanding shocks and adapting to new challenges. Between 2020-2025, GPE will support transformative change in up to 90 countries and territories, which are home to 1 billion children.

For more information, please contact:

Agather Stevene is learning tailoring at Msaginya Folk Development College (FDC), Katavi Region, Tanzania. August 2019. Credit: GPE/Kelley Lynch
Agather Stevene is learning tailoring at Msaginya Folk Development College (FDC), Katavi Region, Tanzania. August 2019.
Credit:
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Gender equality
Sub-Saharan Africa: Tanzania

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