Members of Parliament in the UK join forces to discuss GPE and girls’ education

On January 27, GPE joined the UK’s All-Party Parliamentary Group on Global Education and the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office for a virtual discussion on girls’ education and GPE’s financing campaign.

February 08, 2021 by GPE Secretariat
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2 minutes read
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Members of UK’s Parliament and other invited guests raise their hands in support of GPE and global education.
Members of UK’s Parliament and other invited guests raise their hands in support of GPE and global education.
GPE

On Wednesday, January 27, GPE joined the UK’s All-Party Parliamentary Group (AAPG) and the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) for a virtual parliamentary roundtable event.

Participants discussed the vital role GPE’s Global Education Summit will have in transforming girls’ education and the urgency of education financing in the context of COVID-19.

Harriett Baldwin MP, AAPG Chair and Chris Matheson MP, AAPG Vice-Chair, co-moderated the discussion.

The dialogue started with remarks from Wendy Morton MP, Minister for European Neighbourhood and the Americas at the FCDO.

“Educating girls is a lifeline for them as individuals, it’s a game changer for development, and it’s the key to solving many of the world’s problems. That’s why the UK will be asking the G7 to sign up to ambitious global targets to change the prospects for millions of girls and to get sustainable development goal 4 back on track,” said Wendy Morton MP.

Alice Albright, Chief Executive Officer of GPE, outlined the “Raise Your Hand” campaign and the role the UK can play in ensuring a successful replenishment.

“We are looking to raise at least $5 billion to support our work over the next five years. This funding will leverage partnerships and other resources to enable countries to improve how they deliver education.”

Parliamentarians also heard from Selina Nkoile, a GPE Youth Leader from Kenya who was among the first generation of girls from her Masai village to attend school.

“Through education, I have become an empowered woman and I have gone back to my village to advocate and campaign for more girls to attend school and gain an education,”

“If it were not for external financing, I would never have gone to school. I really commend everyone who is taking their time and any of their powers to support education for children” said Selina Nkoile.

Lastly, participants discussed the varying effects COVID-19 has had on the education of young girls and other barriers to education such as security, nutrition programs and sanitation.

“We know that GPE has a multiplier effect in increasing both funding and activities. The work that GPE has planned very flexibly in adapting to the COVID-situation, by working with other multilateral organizations and national governments, is really important,” said Pauline Rose, Director, Research for Equitable Access and Learning (REAL) Centre, Cambridge University.

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